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Royal Canal

A Guide to Staying on the Correct Side of the Royal Canal

Probably the most frequent question I get asked by those wanting to walk, run or cycle the Royal Canal is which side of the canal should I be on? As a rule of thumb I would always advise people to follow the National Famine Way Signs along the route but below is a list of the 18 crossings and the distance between them from the Sea Lock at the Liffey to the 46th Lock near the Shannon to ensure you are on the correct side to avoid dead ends, backtracking and detours.

National Famine Way Sign on the Royal Canal

As the canal mainly runs from east to west I will refer to being either being on the North Bank (the canal is on your left as you face west away from Dublin) and the South Bank (the canal is on your right as you face west away from Dublin). This is correct as of August 2020 when the Royal Canal Greenway has been completed from Maynooth to Cloondara and the connection from Sheriff Street to Newcomen Bridge has also opened.

The Route of the Royal Canal

Starting at the Lifting Bridges over the Sea Lock at the Convention Centre Dublin it is 2.25km to Binns Bridge and the 2nd Lock in Drumcondra on the South Bank.

Lifting Bridges over the Sea Lock at the Convention Centre Dublin
Approaching Binn’s Bridge and the 2nd Lock

Crossing Binns Bridge at the traffic lights it is then 5.25km to Longford Bridge and the 10th Lock at Ashtown along the North Bank.

Longford Bridge at the 10th Lock, Ashtown

Crossing the new suspension footbridge beside Longford Bridge it is 5.15km to Keenan Bridge at Porterstown on the South Bank. You will know Keenan Bridge from the Memorial Plaque for the sinking of the Longford Passenger Boat which is located on the bridge after you cross it.

Keenan Bridge, Porterstown with abandoned school behind it

From Keenan Bridge it is a long 32.5km stretch on the North Bank before you will need to cross again at Enfield Bridge. There are a set of pedestrian lights at Enfield Bridge to help cross the road also.

Enfield Bridge with pedestrian lights visible top right

Leaving Enfield Bridge it is 6.25km to the Moyvalley Bridges on the South Bank. Here you will rise up the new long ramp and cross over the canal to Furey’s Pub.

Ramp Up to Moyvalley Bridge

From Furey’s it is 10km to Ballasport Bridge on the North Bank.. Ballasport Bridge is in a remote location so is best to remember to cross the next bridge after the village of Hill of Down.

Crossing Ballasport Bridge it is 5.85km on the South Bank to D’Arcy’s Bridge. This is a long section for there to be no other bridges between them so all you need to remember is to cross the next bridge.

D’Arcy’s Bridge

After crossing D’Arcy’s Bridge it is a short 1.3km stretch to Thomastown Bridge and the 18th Lock on the North Bank. This is also the location of Nanny Quinn’s pub.

Thomastown Bridge at the 18th Lock

Crossing Thomastown Bridge to the South Bank we start up the flight of locks as far as Riverstown Bridge and the 22nd Lock, a distance of 1.85km. Cunningham’s Pub and shop will be signposted at Riverstown Bridge.

Riverstown Bridge at the 22nd Lock

Crossing Riverstown Bridge at the 22nd Lock we continue on up to the Summit Level on the North Bank for a distance of 3.3km before reaching McNead’s Bridge at Mary Lynch’s pub, just after we pass under the N4.

McNead’s Bridge viewed from the Mullingar side

Crossing McNead’s Bridge we have a long section of 17.2km on the South Bank, passing the whole way through Mullingar to Belmont Bridge where you will see a sharp rise up to the bridge level.

Belmont Bridge

Crossing Belmont Bridge we have the shortest single section of .65km on the North Bank as we get to Ballinea Harbour and Bridge. Coming up from the harbour car park, you can cross the original canal bridge before dropping down on the other side before the new road bridge beside it.

Continuing on the South Bank from the Ballinea Bridges we travel a distance of 15.6km as far as Kelly’s Bridge at the 38th Lock, descending all the way down from the 26th Lock at Coolnahay.

Crossing Kelly’s Bridge at the 38th Lock we travel 5.65km as far as Webb Bridge in Abbeyshrule Village on the North Bank, crossing into Co. Longford along the way. The Rustic Inn pub is located on the South Bank just before Webb Bridge.

Webb Bridge viewed from the South Bank by the Rustic Inn

After crossing Webb Bridge we have another long stretch of 18.55km along the South Bank before reaching Island Bridge at Mosstown Harbour just outside Keenagh. Island Bridge is a relatively new bridge and requires caution crossing the main road as you cross the bridge to the other side.

Island Bridge before Mosstown Harbour

From Island Bridge at Mosstown Harbour it is a short 1.45km section on the North Bank to Coolnahinch Bridge at the 41st Lock.

Coolnahinch Bridge from the 41st Lock

Crossing back to the South Bank at Coolnahinch Bridge at the 41st Lock it is 3.1km to the Ballinamore Bridges. The Ballinamore Bridges are made up of an original canal bridge and a modern road bridge. Again caution is needed crossing the main road here as you also cross the canal.

Bank on the North Bank after the Ballinamore Bridges it is 3.2km on the North Bank to Aghnaskea Bridge and the 43rd Lock, passing the Longford Branch Junction along the way.

Looking west from Aghnaskea Bridge at the 43rd Lock

Crossing Aghnaskea Bridge to the South Bank with the church it is then a final 6.5 km to the end of the Royal Canal at the 46th Lock after Richmond Harbour. Caution is needed crossing the main road at the Begnagh Lifting Bridge but you still remain on the South Bank of the canal.

Shannon Navigation Sign at the 46th and last lock of the Royal Canal

After navigating all those bridges why not watch a take a minute to look a video of all the crossing points of the Royal Canal (there are about 120 in all).

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 5: Maynooth to Enfield

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar to Coolnahay

Part 9: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 11: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

Part 12: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Part 13: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

Part 14: The Lough Owel Feeder

Part 15: The Longford Branch

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Royal Canal

Cycling on the Royal Canal: Maynooth to Enfield

After covering the last few sections on my feet, here I take to my bike to cover some more ground as we get further west into more rural landscape. That said the Royal Canal Greenway is a major training ground for the runners of Maynooth and Kilcock.

Bike at Maynooth Harbour

In this post I am going to take a look at cycling from what is currently the start of the Royal Canal Greenway at Maynooth Harbour and heading west as far as Enfield Bridge, a distance of 18.7 kilometres.

Maynooth Harbour just before dawn

Maynooth Harbour, located on the 13th level of the Royal Canal, is a great place to start. It is easily accessible from Dublin, with Maynooth Train Station lying on the south bank of the canal. A footbridge gives access to the north bank and the Royal Canal Greenway. Maynooth Harbour is a triangle shaped harbour with a slipway on the town side. It has an island with nesting swans in the centre. It would have been built between 1790 and 1796 making it a contemporary of the near by St. Patrick’s University which opened in 1795.

Maynooth Swans with their cygnets and the island in the background – Summer 2019

We depart Maynooth heading west on a tarmac path heading a short distance of 500 metres before we encounter Bond Bridge which was originally built in 1795. In 2005 Jons Engineering were contracted to widen and realign the bridge to make it safer for the traffic it carries over the canal. The new bridge opened in 2007 and also has cycle lanes over it with steps accessing the Royal Canal Greenway on the east side and a ramp down the west side.

Approaching Bond Bridge from Maynooth Harbour

After passing under Bond Bridge we transition from tarmac onto a smooth, light stone dust surface which will be the norm for most the way to Enfield. The South Campus wall of the university keeps us company for 750 metres as we leave Maynooth behind us. This old stone wall separates the canal bank from the playing fields and grounds of the old campus.

Pacman Graffiti on College Wall

As we reach the end of the college wall we pass the old college farmhouse and sheds. It is nearly 1 kilometre from the end of the college wall to the next landmark of Jackson’s Bridge and the 14th Lock. Jackson’s Bridge is made up of 5 spanning arches including a narrow pedestrian arch (for which cyclists should dismount), the canal, the railway and two arches for farm animals on the south bank. The original canal span was built in 1793 while the railway span was abutted in the late 1840’s.

The 5 arches of Jackson’s Bridge with 14th Lock

We emerge on the upper 14th level after passing through the pedestrian arch with the 14th Lock revealing itself fully to view.

Water Cascading down into the 14th Lock

Leaving Jackson’s Bridge behind we proceed for 1.7 kilometres before we reach the next landmark of Bailey’s Bridge, an accommodation bridge giving the local farmer access to both sides of the canal. As part of the work to create the Royal Canal Greenway the bridge was extended to give users safe passage under the bridge rather than force them through the narrow passage that still exists.

Bailey’s Bridge with new Greenway passage

Moving on past North Kildare Club with its rugby, cricket and hockey pitches it is another 750 metres to Chamber’s Bridge and the 15th Lock. It is common to find several barges and Waterways Ireland work boats moored up at the bridge. One such barge is Anam Cara (previously Maeve) which was once used by actors Timothy West and Prunella Scales in their Channel 4 series Great Canal Journeys as they explored the Shannon-Erne Waterway. The barge was also used for the TV3 series Jingle Jangle which featured a large array of prominent Irish musicians as the barge made its way west from Dublin to Cloondara on the Royal Canal.

15th Lock from Chamber’s Bridge with Anam Cara and other barges in the background on a rather wet day.

There is another 500 metres of the light stone dust after Chamber’s Bridge before we reach another stretch of tarmac on the approach to Kilcock. As we meet the tarmac, the Royal Canal Greenway lines up and runs parallel with a road, a railway, the canal, the greenway itself, another road and the Rye River. It is 1 kilometre from the start of the tarmac surface to Kilcock Harbour.

Approaching Kilcock

Kilcock Harbour has been wonderfully restored and is home to Kilcock Canoe Polo Club. The Royal Canal opened to commercial traffic in December 1796, six years after construction started. Barges initially started operating between Broadstone and Kilcock. At the end of Kilcock Harbour is the upgraded Shaw’s Bridge and the double-chambered 16th Lock.

Shaw’s Bridge with the 16th Lock behind it and goals from the Canoe Polo Club in the foreground.

In total it is just under 6 kilometres from Maynooth Harbour to Kilcock Harbour. As we must dismount to cross the road at Shaw’s Bridge, you may wish to stop for some refreshments before continuing on. Just across the road from the canal is the very popular Black Forest Cafe and Cakery while just a little further into the town there is a Costa Coffee as well as a large Supervalu for supplies. The Rye River Cafe is also another popular spot for breakfast or lunch not far off the canal.

Upper chamber of the 16th Lock

After coming up onto the 16th level there is a small blue container. This marks the start of the Royal Canal parkrun, Kilcock which is a weekly, free 5k run that goes out west and comes back on the banks of the canal.

The tarmac continues from the 16th Lock for just over 1 kilometre as far as Allen Bridge which is known locally as Spins Bridge. Allen Bridge was originally built in 1796 but like Bond Bridge and Shaw’s Bridge, it was later modified for modern traffic. However when you pass under the bridge you can still see the original arch.

Original arch visible under Allen (Spins) Bridge

On coming out on the other side of Allen Bridge we return to the light stone dust surface. A new spillway has been completed not far west of the bridge which replaced a narrow wooden bridge over a dip of the old slipway.

The original overflow with wooden bridge before being replaced

As we continue west for 2.75 kilometres towards McLoughlin’s Bridge and the 17th Lock (which is locally known as Ferns Lock) we cross the county border from Kildare to Meath. The Royal Canal crosses back and forth across this county line several times as the canal makes its way west.

Looking up the double-chambered 17th (Ferns) Lock from McLoughlin’s Bridge

Ferns Lock has several features around it. The bridge coming into the lock no longer has an arch and now has a low concrete plinth which has been known to catch the top of wheelhouses of boats passing under it. This happened the Heritage Boat Rambler during filming of the late Dick Warner’s Waterways – The Royal Canal series for RTÉ. It is a rare complaint on the Royal Canal that the water level is too high for such problems to happen. Unlike all the bridges we have met so far, McLoughlin’s Bridge has no abutment to a railway bridge and instead is level with a level crossing at the bridge. The 17th Lock is the last double-chambered lock on the Royal Canal coming from Dublin and marks the start of The Long Level which is a 32 kilometer stretch before the 18th Lock at Thomastown. There is also a restored storehouse beside the lock, now a private residence.

Restored storehouse and store at Ferns Lock

Leaving Ferns Lock we remain on the north bank on one of the most recently completed sections of the Royal Canal Greenway. Until late in the summer of 2019 it was necessary to travel the 5.9 kilometre section from Ferns Lock to Cloncurry Bridge on the south bank. This is a grassy and often muddy trail generally unsuitable for cycling. Thankfully the north bank is now complete and is a pleasurable cycle. The new section does veer a little away from the canal at a few points but never too far to see and it includes a section where the path winds through a forest.

Royal Canal Greenway going through the forest as seen from the south bank

One of the few disadvantages of travelling on the smooth north bank now is that you miss the original 22 and 23 Mile Markers for the canal, 2 of the very few ones left standing. These measure the distance not from the River Liffey but rather from Broadstone.

The 23rd Mile Marker on the south bank near Cloncurry

Not long after the forest, we pass a farm house which leads us back onto a tarmac surface for the last 2 kilometers to Cloncurry Bridge. The area around Cloncurry is probably best known from the poem The Old Bog Road by Teresa Brayton, an Irish Nationalist from Kilcock who emigrated to America in 1895.

The Old Bog Road and Teresa Brayton information sign

She wrote widely on the themes of exile, nostalgic loss of homeland, nationalism and religion. She returned to Ireland in 1932 where she lived in nearby Kilbrook until her death in 1943. The Old Bog Road was put to music by Madeline King O’Farrelly from Rochfortbridge in Westmeath and has been recorded by many artists.

Cloncurry Bridge looking east

Remaining on the north bank we must cross over the road at Cloncurry Bridge to continue on our way to our destination in Enfield, a distance of 3 kilometres. Some caution is needed for the first kilometer of this as it is on a public road by the canal until you pass through a pair of wooden gates back onto the dust surface of the Royal Canal Greenway.

Enfield Train Station on the south bank.

Coming into Enfield, the railway station and a variety of connected buildings originally opened by the Midlands Great Western Railway company in the late 1840’s can be seen on the opposite bank. Buildings include the Railway Station, the Station Masters House, Warehouses, a Signal Box and Water Towers. Finally we approach our destination of Enfield Bridge, 18.7 kilometres from where we started at Maynooth Harbour.

Sunrise on the Royal Canal from Enfield Bridge.

On reaching Enfield there are a variety of places to take a break. Closest to the bridge itself is the Bridgehouse pub which does pub grub. There is an Applegreen with a Subway just a little further into town for those only looking for light refreshments. A favourite of mine would be the Street Side Cafe. Like Maynooth and Kilcock, Enfield also has a Supervalu close to the canal for those looking for a supermarket.

Enfield Bridge. Much like Allen Bridge in Kilcock the old bridge is hidden under the widened road bridge above it.

Once you are fueled again you’ll be ready for the cycle back to Maynooth or, if you are taking it easy, the intercity from Sligo stops in Enfield roughly every 2 hours and will see you back to Maynooth or Dublin Connolly. Booking with Irish Rail is advised with bike as the trains can only facilitate 2 bikes per train.

Enfield Train Station Water Tower

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar to Coolnahay

Part 9: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 11: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

Part 12: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Part 13: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

Part 14: The Lough Owel Feeder

Part 15: The Longford Branch

Annex 1: The Old Rail Trail – Mullingar to Athlone

Categories
Royal Canal

Walking on the Royal Canal: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Coolnahay and the 26th Lock mark the western end of the Summit Level of the Royal Canal and it is the perfect place to slow things down again and walk the 8km stretch to Ballynacargy. The advantage of leaving the Summit Level is this walk is all down hill from the 26th Lock to the 35th Lock and all of it is covered on the southern bank.

View from Coolnahay Bridge (Dolan Bridge) of Coolnahay Harbour, 26th Lock and Lock Keeper’s Cottage on the right.

There is a small car park on the west side of Coolnahay Bridge (Dolan Bridge) across the road from the Lock Keeper’s Cottage that is fine to leave a car for several hours.

Looking west from Coolnahay Car Park

For those interested in the history of the building of the Royal Canal, Coolnahay also marks a very important point in the construction of the canal. The canal reached Coolnahay in 1809, some 19 years after construction first began in Dublin and by this stage the company was heavily in debt and unable to cover the construction costs to complete the canal. It was decided that the Royal Canal Company would be dissolved and the canal completed to the Shannon using public funds. In 1813 the Directors General of Inland Navigation took on to complete the canal under engineer John Killaly and contractors Henry, Mullins and McMahon. You may remember we previously came across the formation of this firm when they tendered for the restoration and extension of the Naas Branch of the Grand Canal as to Corbally Harbour.

Information sign at Whitworth Aqueduct about the construction of the Royal Canal from Coolnahay to Clondra.

As previously mentioned, one of the advantages of this section is a continuous drop down through 10 locks to Ballynacargy. The other big advantage of this area is the pure scenic nature of the remainder of the canal. Mullingar is the last large urban centre we pass through on our way west and from Coolnahay we are truly out in the remote country side only passing through the odd small village or skirting around a small town. 400m from Dolan Bridge we come to the 27th Lock.

27th Lock Gates

Another 500m on from the 27th Lock we come to the 28th Lock which lies slightly around the next bend. Another feature of the Royal Canal as we move further west is that it begins to meander more through the landscape. For those of you who may have seen RTÉ’s Waterways: The Royal Canal series with Dick Warner, you may recall an interview with the daughter of the last lock keeper of the 26th Lock who discusses how her father, Michael Christie, would also look after the 27th and 28th Locks, cycling down to them from the cottage on the 26th Lock. As such it is no surprise that we do not find any cottages at these locks.

Looking up the 28th Lock Chamber

500m on from the 28th Lock we come to Walsh’s Bridge, an accommodation bridge over the canal. It is possible to walk under the bridge or to rise up over the road allowing for a good view down the canal.

Walsh’s Bridge on a soft day.

It is a 1.5km walk on from Walsh’s Bridge to Kildallan Bridge and the start of the quick descent down the 29th, 30th and 31st Locks.

29th Lock and Kildallan Bridge in the background

The three locks are in a linear stretch not long after the bridge. Each lock also has a restored Lock Keeper’s Cottage beside them.

Restored front of the 30th Lock Keepers Cottage

Each of these have been largely extended and modernised they make for appealing private residences on the bank of the canal.

31st Lock Keeper’s Cottage

The canal path takes a sharp left after the 31st Lock before taking a sharp right to be greeted by Kill Bridge and the 32nd Lock.

32nd Lock and Kill Bridge

Kill Bridge is another accommodation bridge, something more common the further west you go as farmers needed access both sides of the canal as it cut through the land.

Looking down the 33rd Lock

It is a little over 500m down to the 33rd Lock before a 1.2km straight on to Balroe Bridge and the 34th Lock.

34th Lock and Balroe Bridge

With the passing of the 34th Lock we are now onto our final 2km stretch towards the 35th Lock and Ballynacargy.

Ballynacargy Harbour looking towards the 35th Lock

As we pass the 35th Lock and its Lock Keeper’s Cottage the large and magnificent Ballynacargy Harbour opens out into our view.

35th Lock Keepers Cottage

On the south bank we see the remains of the old Hotel and Store House while the majority of the small village sits on the opposite bank. There are also a few picnic benches out around the harbour which makes it a pleasant place to stop.

Remains of Ballynacargy Hotel and Store

At the end of the harbour is Ballynacargy Bridge which will give you access to the village itself. The village has a few small pubs, newsagents, garage and a chipper so its possible to grab a snack or a drink before making the trip back to Coolnahay or onwards to Abbeyshrule where I will pick up in part 10 below.

Ballynacargy Bridge and Harbour

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 5: Maynooth to Enfield

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar Harbour to Coolnahay

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 11: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

Part 12: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Part 13: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

Part 14: The Lough Owel Feeder

Part 15: The Longford Branch

Annex 1: The Old Rail Trail – Mullingar to Athlone

Categories
Royal Canal

Walking on the Royal Canal: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

The 9km section between Abbeyshrule and Ballybrannigan Harbour just outside of Ballymahon is one of the quietest and most picturesque sections of the Royal Canal and well worth the visit to meander around the many bends of the canal here. Leaving Abbeyshrule we first cross over Webb Bridge to the southern bank of the canal which we will stay on for this entire stretch.

Webb Bridge looking west from Abbeyshrule

Descending down on the other side of Webb Bridge there is a playground and some picnic benches. As previously mentioned, Abbesyshrule has a very active and proud Tidy Towns group and this can be seen by all the effort gone into with planting, sculptures and public areas around the harbour both sides of the bridge. If you look to the left beyond the River Inny you can see the ruins of the Abbey and its bell tower in the distance by the graveyard.

Ruins of Abbeyshrule Abbey

Rounding the corner leaving Abbeyshrule it is 1.5km to the 39th Lock at Draper’s Bridge. The 39th Lock is the only lock we will encounter today and the 39th Level is the longest level on the western side of the Summit Level being a little over 11km long before reaching the 40th Lock.

39th Lock and Draper’s Bridge

Almost hidden behind the overgrowth beside the 39th Lock is the remains of the Lock Keeper’s Cottage. Behind a house on the main road the walls remain intact of this two room cottage, same in design as many of the previous ones we’ve seen but sadly the roof has come in and not much else remains except for the two fireplaces.

One of the fireplaces inside the remains of the Lock Keeper’s Cottage at the 39th Lock.

A little over 1.5km on from the 39th Lock with come to Allard’s Bridge which is an accommodation bridge allowing farmers access to both sides of the canal. It is possible to pass under the bridge and if you do you can see a cut into the stone on both sides that allows wooden boards to be places to stop the water. These slots can be found at several bridges and are useful when you need to stem the water when carrying out maintenance or fixing a breach.

Slots in the stone work of Allard’s Bridge to slide in wooden slats to stop the water and allow of maintenance

As I was passing Allard’s Bridge on my most recent trip I came across Riversdale Holidays The Sub barge passing under the Bridge as it was heading west. The Sub is available for hire by holiday makers for those looking to take a leisurely break on the Royal Canal.

The Sub passing under Allard’s Bridge

A little over 1km from Allard’s Bridge is Guy’s Bridge. This is another accommodation bridge though it is my understanding that from here it is now possible to cross down to the bank of the Inny and onto Newcastle Woods before crossing the restored White’s Bridge which will bring you into the new Longford Centre Parcs. I seem to have missed this new path completely so I will need to go back and confirm and will update this post accordingly when I have.

Guy’s Bridge which you can pass under or climb up to get a view of the canal.

After passing Guy’s Bridge there is a sharp right hand bend to bring you up the straight towards Molly Ward’s Bridge which lies just 500m beyond. Molly Ward’s Bridge is also an accommodation bridge and seeing these three almost uniform bridges in a row shows the great skill of the workmen who built them. All built to the same design they stand proud in their surroundings over 200 years later, surviving the downturn of the canal, its closing and then its restoration.

Molly Ward’s Bridge

1km further on we come to Fowlard’s or Cloonard Bridge which carries the N55 road from Edgeworthstown to Ballymahon. Unfortunately being such an important road, the original narrow humpback bridge is gone, only the limestone retaining walls remaining. When passing under the concrete structure you can see marks of where the modified bridge passed at a much lower level as clearance for boats was no longer necessary when then canal was closed. Thankfully Longford County Council altered, raised or rebuilt several bridges that they had only made culverts for when the Royal Canal closed to trade to once again allow for navigation.

The outline of height of the span of Fowlard’s Bridge before it was raised to allow for boats to navigate again on the reopening of the canal

1.5km from on from Fowlard’s Bridge we come to Toome Bridge. It was from here that passengers on the Royal Canal boats could catch a Bianconi Coach to Athlone up until the Midland Great Western Railway opened their station in Athlone around 1850.

Toome Bridge

A little over 1km from Toome Bridge we cross over one of the several spillways on the canal extension built between Coolnahay and Cloondara. This one is similar to the one previously mentioned near the Whitworth Aqueduct but retains its original arch without a plinth blocking it. Theses spillways had a raised shelf where excess water would spill over down under the arch and to a water source below.

Overflow shelf and arch of spillway west of Toome Bridge

It is slightly short of 1km to Chaigneau Bridge and Ballybrannigan Harbour from the overflow. The bridge still retains a turnstile type gate underneath it which used to be found at several of these bridges so it is easier to go up and over this bridge to enter the harbour area.

Chaigneau Bridge with the restored ticket office visible through the arch.

Over the bridge the canal opens up to one of its more substantial harbours with boats often found mooring here. Standing prominently over the harbour is also the remains of an old canal storehouse which is increasinly being consumed by ivy.

Canal Store at Ballybrannigan

At the end of the harbour is the restored ticket house which to the best of my knowledge is used by the Royal Canal Amenity Group.

Restored ticket office at Ballybrannigan Harbour

Not far from the ticket office at the wall of the harbour you can still make out the engraving marking the restoration of the harbour and this part of the canal by the Royal Canal Amenity Group and the Office for Public Works in 1995. The O.P.W. had responsibility for the canal before the establishment of Waterways Ireland.

Engraving marking the restoration of this part of the canal in 1995. I think the image on the left is the O.P.W. logo.

It is about a 2km walk from the harbour into the small town of Ballymahon where there are several pubs and shops to eat or get supplies. However the town is best reached from Longford Bridge which I will cover in the next section.

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 5: Maynooth to Enfield

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar to Coolnahay

Part 9: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 12: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Part 13: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

Part 14: The Lough Owel Feeder

Part 15: The Longford Branch

Annex 1: The Old Rail Trail – Mullingar to Athlone

Categories
Royal Canal

Walking on the Royal Canal: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Ballybrannigan as previously mentioned is a harbour just to the north of Ballymahon. Before taking to the Greenway to the 41st Lock, a distance of 11km, I decided to call into the town for some lunch to fuel for my walk. Ballymahon has a very wide main street with plenty of parking and local pubs, garages and shops to make it worth the 2km diversion off the canal. This time around I had a fantastic meal at Cooney’s Hotel on the main street.

Cooney’s Hotel, Ballymahon

Once I had my fill I was back to Ballybrannigan Harbour where there is some limited parking beside the old canal storehouse. Heading west on the south bank of the canal it is 1.5km from the harbour to Longford Bridge. This bridge is a relatively new addition to the canal carrying the R392 from Lanesborough to Ballymahon. The bridge replaced a culvert that previously blocked the navigation of the canal. Some limited parking is also available on the east side of the bridge and is a popular spot with locals taking short walks on the Greenway.

Approaching the gates at Longford Bridge and Car Park

Truth be told Longford Bridge is more ideally suited to come on and get off the canal for Ballymahon as it leads straight down to the main street albeit a similar distance as Ballybrannigan. On the left of the gates the wall of the car park area has several paintings of the canal done by local artists.

Art at Longford Bridge

Passing under the bridge and staying on the south bank as we do the whole way to Mosstown Harbour, it is less than 1km before we reach Archie’s Bridge along with its canal storehouse and another building which may have once served as a ticket office. If you look closely you will also see evidence of the quay wall at the bridge.

Canal buildings on the west side of Archie’s Bridge

It is possible to pass under Archie’s Bridge or to come up to the main road level before descending down on the other side. As there is a main road going over the bridge it is advisable to dismount your bike before crossing over and to be aware of traffic.

Archie’s Bridge

Along the 1.5km from Archie’s Bridge to the 40th Lock with its accommodation bridge and lock keeper’s cottage at Mullawornia the canal takes a definitive turn towards the north.

40th Lock, Accommodation Bridge and Lock Keeper’s Cottage with extended porch

Consideration had been made to carry on west when building the canal straight to Lough Ree from this point in order to save costs however the Grand Canal Company opposed this and insisted that the Royal Canal be completed to it’s original planned terminus at Cloondara some 19km’s further on. As you round the corner after the lock you can see the bedrock of Mullawornia Hill as the canal skirts around it and a steep drop off the Greenway on the other side.

Canal turning north around Mullawornia Hill

It is just under 1km from the 40th Lock to the Pake Bridges where we again cross under the R392. We come to the original Pake Bridge first passing under it before we pass under the abutted new bridge which was rebuilt from a culvert to allow for full navigation of the canal. There is a sharp turn to the left as you come out from the new bridge. Unlike the long stretches of many of the previous sections the canal twists and turns more and more as we near its end.

The original Pake Bridge with the new one hidden behind it

1.5km from the Pake Bridges we come to Foigha Harbour and Bridge. I think calling this a harbour is a little generous but there is a jetty with room to tie up a few small boats the east side of the bridge.

Foigha Harbour and Bridge

If at this point you are looking to take a small break, Leavy’s of Foigha is only 300m from the bridge and while the grocery shop has closed the pub is still up and running.

Leavy’s of Foigha

Back on the south bank of the canal it is just under 2km to the next landmark of Cloonbreany Bridge. Leaving Foigha it does feel like the Greenway passes right through the front of a private garden but rest assured you are on the right side as you pass through the familiar wooden gates. I once led a group down the other bank to find us having to climb gates and hop over cow pats before correcting ourselves at the next bridge.

Cloonbreany Bridge

Between Cloonbreany and Mosstown Harbour we pass alongside Corlea Bog which includes a visitor centre for the Corlea Trackway, an old trackway that dates back to 148-147BC. A walk has been built around the bog much like the surface of the Greenway and links the canal directly to the visitor’s centre for those who have the time and interest to take the small diversion off the canal.

Sign for the Corlea Bog Amenity Walk where it meets the canal

Not far from where we meet the Corlea Bog Amenity Walk we come to Island Bridge which lies on the outskirts of the village of Keenagh. A new path links the canal to the village and is only a short distance for those looking for a shop.

Island bridge from Mosstown Harbour

Island Bridge is another location that had been culverted when the canal had closed and has since been been replaced with a higher bridge to allow for navigation of the canal once again. It is necessary to come up onto the bridge to cross the canal before coming down into Mosstown Harbour on the other side.

Mosstown Harbour from Island Bridge

Mosstown Harbour has a small car park and several picnic benches beside it and is probably a more suitable spot for starting or stopping along this section however for this post I will be pushing on just a little further. A little beyond the car park on the road that leaves the canal path is a gate house for Mosstown House which was demolished in the early 1960’s.

National Famine Way Shoes Memorial at Mosstown Harbour

Mosstown House is of note to us canal enthusiasts as the home of Newcomen family. Sir William Gleadowe-Newcomen was a banker and politician who was also an early subscriber of the Royal Canal Company, the bridge at the 1st Lock on North Strand Road being named for him. While the house is lost and is now the site of a modern farm, the remains of the Mosstown pigeon house can be found not far from the canal. A small cottage can also be found on the opposite bank.

Cottage near Mosstown Harbour

Not far from the harbour is another one of the overflows we previosuly encountered around Abbeyshrule. There is a former mill close to the spillway which dates from around the same time as the canal and some associated works where the canal may have even supplied water can be spotted along this stretch.

Overflow near Mosstown Harbour

1km on from the overflow we reach today’s destination of the 41st Lock at Coolnahinch Bridge with it’s adjacent restored Lock Keeper’s Cottage which is now a private residence.

41st Lock Chamber and Lock Keeper’s Cottage from Coolnahinch Bridge

There is no suitable parking here so if stopping for collection Mosstown Harbour does make more sense. For me though I will be walking back to pick up my car at Ballybrannigan Harbour and grabbing a bite to eat in Cooney’s Hotel before the drive home. For those pushing on it is only 13km to the end of the canal at Richmond Harbour.

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 5: Maynooth to Enfield

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar to Coolnahay

Part 9: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 11: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

Part 13: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

Part 14: The Lough Owel Feeder

Part 15: The Longford Branch

Annex 1: The Old Rail Trail – Mullingar to Athlone

Categories
Royal Canal

Walking on the Royal Canal: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

It is just under 13km from our starting point at the 41st Lock to the end of the Royal Canal where it joins the Camlin River at the 46th Lock just beyond Richmond Harbour in Cloondara.

41st Lock Chamber and Coolnahinch Bridge

We are now over 130km from our starting point at the Sea Lock on the Liffey. We have left urban Dublin, passed through the commuter towns of north Kildare, eased by the green pastures of Meath, summitted the canal as we passed through Westmeath and are now gently descending towards the Shannon in Longford.

GPX Trace of the Royal Canal

We start on the south or what could more likely described as the west bank of the Royal Canal as we now head north towards our destination. It is 1.5km to Ard’s Bridge, an accommodation bridge that can be walked under or ascended over depending on the view you want.

Ards Bridge

400m on from Ards Bridge we come to the 42nd Lock and it’s Lock Keeper’s Cottage.

42nd Lock and Cottage

Less than 1km from the lock we reach the Lyneen or Ballinamore Bridges which similar to several bridges we have come to west of Mullingar includes the original canal crossing beside a much newer road bridge. It is necessary to ascend up the road bridge and cross the canal over to the other side to continue our journey but be mindful that this is a busy road.

Lyneen Old Bridge with the new bridge visible through the arch

Down on the other side we continue on for 1km to the Lower Lyneen or Crossover Bridge. This bridge is on the approach to the Longford Junction of the canal and was originally built to enable horses which would have towed boats from the western bank of the canal to Cloondara to cross over the canal so that they could tow their boats on towards Longford Harbour. As the Greenway travels along the east bank now there is no need to cross the bridge but it does afford the wanderer a chance to rise up and take a good view.

Crossover Bridge

A little further on from the bridge are the ruins of a small canal building on the opposite bank.

Ruins near Longford Junction

Not much further on we come to the junction with the Longford Branch at Cloonsheerin. There is a decent path the whole way from the junction into Longford town and for those using a train it may be more useful to take this route which I discuss here. The Longford Branch is roughly 8.5km long so is similar in distance from this point to Cloondara.

The dam between the main branch and the Longford Branch at Cloonsheerin

Crossing the Longford Branch is simple as the Greenway is carried over the junction on the dam between the main line and the branch. It is just under 1.5km from here to the 43rd Lock and Aghnaskea Bridge. There is also a restored Lock Keeper’s Cottage at the 43rd Lock.

43rd Lock Chamber from Aghnaskea Bridge

Behind the cottage is St. Patrick’s Church. The church was built in 1829. Cruciform in plan, it was built by the Rev. Richard Farrell on land donated by the New Royal Canal Company.

St. Patrick’s Church

Aghnaskea is roughly 1km from Killashee village and is the best opportunity along this section to pick up supplies from a shop in the village. Magans is a popular pub in the village and a stopping point for many a traveler.

Clock Tower dedicated to the King-Harmon Family in Keenagh

Returning to the canal on the western bank it is a little over 500m to the 44th Lock and Savage Bridge. There is also a restored Lock Keeper’s Cottage at the lock including a plaque honouring Frances K. Kelly of Forrest Hills, New York who paid for the restoration of the house in 1990.

Restored 44th Lock Keepers Cottage

1km on from the 44th Lock is Ballydrum Bridge just before the canal enters Begnagh Bog.

Ballydrum Bridge

As we pass through the bog we come to the Begnagh Lifting Bridge and the original Begnagh Bridge. The lifting bridge carries the main road between Killashee and Cloondara and this road must be crossed also to carry on along the Greenway. The bridge’s operation is generally automatic, with boats triggering sensors that close the road barriers and lift the bridge for passage underneath.

Begnagh Lifting Bridge from Begnagh Bridge

1.5km on there is another lifting bridge, this time carrying a Bord Na Mona narrow gauge railway over the canal. The railway connects to Lanesborough Power Station which is due to close by the end of 2020.

Bord Na Mona Railway Lifting and Machinery Bridges

A walking and cycling trail is under construction across sections of bogland to connect Lanesborough to the Royal Canal Greenway. This trail will link Kilnacarrow, a short walk from Lanesborough, with Cloondara. I will endeavour to post further information about this link in the near future. There is also a vehicle access bridge just beyond the lifting bridge giving machinery access to both sides of the bog.

45th Lock looking towards Cloondara

As we reach the end of the bog we get to the 45th Lock at Rinnmount. After we leave the 45th Lock the Royal Canal takes one final turn north east before entering Cloondara which name comes from the Irish Cluain Dá Ráth meaning ‘pasture of two ringforts’.

The final turn of Royal Canal

Entry into the village is gained by passing under the horse shoe arch of Richmond Bridge. As with the previous bridges, the towpath is on the western side of the canal.

Richmond Bridge from the harbour

This opens out into Richmond Harbour, the focal point of the village where many of the buildings around it were built to service trade on the canal. The west bank of the harbour has been developed as a local amenity with a service block including toilets, showers and a Waterways Ireland office beside the bridge as well as a small car park and playground adjacent to the harbour and its moorings.

Richmond Harbour with playground on the opposite side

The Richmond Inn lies at the entrance to the harbour on the east bank. Originally a flax mill built in 1821, this four storey building now serves as a pub and guest house and is the perfect place for any explorer to finish their travels along the Royal Canal with five guest rooms and food served daily. Although it has been altered and changed to reflect its modern function, the scale of the building overlooking the harbour is suggestive of its past and the industrious nature of the canal itself.

Fantastic Feast at the Richmond Inn

Two doors down from The Richmond Inn is the former Harbour Master’s Office which was built around 1825 and is now in use as a private residence. It has a carved limestone date plaque beside the doorway. A slightly earlier office from about 1820 lies attached next door with a square headed carriage arch. Again this has been converted into a private residence.

Richmond Harbour Sign

Aside from the dry dock we encountered in Mullingar Harbour, Richmond Harbour has the only other remaining dry dock on the Royal Canal. Built in 1817, the dry dock in oblong in shape with a central drainage channel and integral staircase. Access is through a set of gates on the south side of the dry dock at the harbour and there is a sluice/drainage gate to the north side of the dry dock.

Richmond Harbour Dry Dock

Slightly to the west of the dry dock at the northern end of the harbour is the last Lock Keeper’s Cottage on the Royal Canal. The cottage is adjacent to the 46th Lock which lies to the northwest of the harbour and marks the last lock on the Royal Canal and where it meets the Camlin River.

46th Lock down into the Camlin

It is not possible for the walker or cyclist to proceed beyond this point and I would suggest they go back to the Richmond Inn for a pint but for the purposes of completeness (and boaters) I will briefly mention the last small stretch along the Camlin River required to get a boat out onto the River Shannon.

Start of the Shannon Navigation

After transiting through the 46th Lock down onto the Camlin River you must head north to avoid the weir which lies on the other side of Richmond Harbour. The cut limestone weir on the river predates the canal by about 50 years. Before reaching the road bridge which carries the N5 over the Camlin River from Longford to Termonbarry we turn west onto the Camlin Canal which is a very short canal linking the Shannon River to the Camlin River and was built in the 1760s. This small canal was most likely designed by Thomas Omer for the Commissioners for Inland Navigation. This small canal has a single bridge crossing it which would have carried the original road to Termonbarry and dates to the same time as the construction of the Camlin Canal. The bridge gives a good viewing platform for the pedestrian to see the majority of the link between the Camlin River and the Shannon River and can be accessed by heading northwest out of Cloondara past the derelict Richmond Mill. There is a Lock Keeper’s Cottage to be found on the north bank by the bridge. This cottage from the 1760’s is quite different to anything else we have encountered and also served as an office for the Shannon Navigation Company but is now disused.

The associated and only lock on the Camlin Canal lies to the west of the cottage. The large lock was first built around 1760 and was altered around 1815 with the coming of the Royal Canal. This lock serves as the last man made structure needed to connect the River Shannon to the River Liffey. Once through the lock you are finally out on the River Shannon with Termonbarry Harbour facing you on the opposite bank of the wide river. From here it is possible to navigate north up to Enniskillen and the Erne, south to Athlone and on to Limerick or should you choose to Shannon Harbour where you can turn east once again and follow the Grand Canal back all the way to the south bank of the Liffey only a short distance from where we started.

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 5: Maynooth to Enfield

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar to Coolnahay

Part 9: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 11: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

Part 12: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Part 14: The Lough Owel Feeder

Part 15: The Longford Branch

Annex 1: The Old Rail Trail – Mullingar to Athlone

Categories
Royal Canal

Walking the Royal Canal: Lough Owel Feeder

Although not navigable, the Lough Owel Feeder on the summit level of the Royal Canal at Mullingar has a decent path along the majority of it and is well worth taking the time to wander the relatively short 4km stretch out to the Sluice House at Lough Owel. The Feeder itself is about 3.5km however it is necessary to divert off the Feeder briefly to make it the whole way to the lake. The Feeder once provided much of the water for the Royal Canal on the Summit Level flowing down to both the Liffey and the Shannon.

National Famine Way Memorial Shoes at the Lough Owel Feeder

The Feeder joins the Royal Canal from the north just east of Mullingar Harbour on the opposite bank from the Royal Canal Greenway. If coming from the Greenway it is worth crossing Scanlon’s Bridge at Mullingar Harbour as mentioned in my Thomastown to Mullingar post. From there you head back past the dry dock to the small bridge seen above with the Famine Shoes that carries a path over the feeder where it joins the canal.

Looking down towards the drainage channel of the Dry Dock at Mullingar

Once over the bridge you can head north on good surface path alongside the Feeder which is considerably smaller than the canal we are used to.

Feeder and path just looking north from where the feeder meets the Royal Canal

About 600m from the start of the Feeder you come to a small bridge that carries a small lane from the town to Oliver Plunkett GAA grounds. Like all the bridges on this section, they look like a mini version of what we are used to. The Feeder itself was built around 1806 when the Royal Canal reached Mullingar, some 16 years after construction started.

Bridge at Oliver Plunkett’s GAA Grounds

Carrying on for another 500m we come to Robinstown Bridge over the R394 Castlepollard Road. This is a main road into Mullingar and has a pedestrian crossing to assist getting across the road. The original bridge was widened and modernised to handle more traffic. There is a Texaco garage near the bridge with a shop and provides the best opportunity to get any snacks on this route.

Robinstown Bridge carrying the Castlepollard Road over the Feeder

250m from after the Castlepollard Road is the Mullingar Union Workhouse Graveyard. The nearby Mullingar Workhouse is now part of Mullingar Hospital. The area around the graveyard is predominantly overgrown but the main gate and some more recent memorials still mark the tone for the area. With the National Famine Way Memorial Shoes at the start of the Feeder, the graveyard serves as a reminder of the harsh times experienced by those who lived by the canal.

Cross and engraving above the gate to the Mullingar Union Workhouse Graveyard.

As we round the next corner the Feeder comes alongside the Sligo Railway Line for a short stretch again, the line that has kept the canal company most of its was from Dublin now accompanies the feeder to the lake.

Irish Rail Intercity running alongside the Feeder

About 650m from the Graveyard we come to a small accommodation bridge as the Feeder takes a slightly more curved route than the direct rail farm. Accommodation bridges were built by the canal company to give access to both sides of the canal for landowners and farmers whose land had been bisected by the construction of the canal.

Feeder looking north from the accommodation bridge

When the Feeder and path meet back up again we can see Cullion Fish Farm. Featured in Waterways: The Royal Canal the fish farm which specialised in Trout was slated for closure in 2016, however it still seems active when I passed it in July of 2020.

Cullion Fish Farm viewed from the Feeder path

According to the Guide to the Royal Canal the fish farm is fed from the feeder through a metering apparatus via a culvert under the path which abstracts water from Lough Owel.

Culvert and metering apparatus from the Feeder to the fish farm

Just past the fish farm we come to Cullion Bridge. It is necessary to leave the feeder path here for about 500m to carry on towards the lake.

Cullion Bridge

As we pass through the gates at the Cullion Bridge you will notice a sign for St. Brigid’s Well to the right just beyond the gate for the fish farm. The small well with the stations of the cross is a peaceful place for reflection and worth dropping into as you pass.

Sign for St. Brigid’s Well

Crossing over Cullion Bridge will bring you past Culleenmore Level Crossing Gates and the Gate Keeper’s Cottage there. Crossing the old Longford Road you will signs for a cycle way which will bring you on towards the lough and return you to the Feeder path.

Culleenmore Level Crossing and Gate Keeper’s Cottage

Along the cycle way you will see a road that leads down to Levington Park, once home to the American novelist and playwright J.P. Donleavy. Best know for his novel The Ginger Man, Donleavy was known for entertaining many celebrity guests at Levington Park up until his death in 2017.

Levington Railway Crossing and Gate Keeper’s Cottage

Rounding the corner of the cycle way you will come to Levington Railway Crossing Gates and Gate Keeper’s Cottage and just before the crossing you will see a sign for Mullingar Sailing Club on the left which will lead you back down along the Feeder to Lough Owel.

Lane on the left to Mullingar Sailing Club & Lough Owel

Following the lane for 200m the Feeder is on your right until you come to a small bridge which brings you back across the Feeder for the final stretch down to Lough Owel.

Bridge over Feeder near Mullingar Sailing Club.

Once over the bridge it is only a little over 400m to Lough Owel. When you get to the lough and Mullingar Sailing Club you will see a small gate and a white house on the left. This is the Sluice House where the flow of the water to the canal was controlled.

Front of the Sluice House with Bridge and Arch over the Feeder on the right

Behind the house on the lake side is the main sluice gate itself.

Main Sluice Gate at the rear of the house. Note the left gate is down but the right gate is up

After the Sluice House you have reached Lough Owel and the original source of much of the Royal Canal’s water. Although an often forgotten part of the Royal Canal, the quality path makes this a pleasurable diversion worth taking when passing Mullingar.

Lough Owel opening up beyond the main Sluice Gate

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 5: Maynooth to Enfield

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar to Coolnahay

Part 9: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 11: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

Part 12: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Part 13: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

Part 15: The Longford Branch

Annex 1: The Old Rail Trail – Mullingar to Athlone

Categories
Royal Canal

Walking on the Royal Canal: The Longford Branch

The Longford Branch of the Royal Canal was built several years after the Main Line was completed to Cloondara in 1817. Offically opened in January 1830 the branch is roughly 8.5km long but has since been shortened slightly after Longford Harbour was filled in and the new terminus moved to the south side of the railway line. While the branch is not navigable an accessible path runs the full length of it to the main line and is suitable for walkers, runners and cyclists.

Example of the path near Churchlands Bridge

As the branch is located close to the railway station I thought it would be a good idea to start this post at the old Longford Harbour and head out towards Cloonsheerin and the junction with the Main Line.

Longford Harbour Master’s House

The former Harbour Master’s House now sits overlooking a car park where the harbour once was. According to the Guide to the Royal Canal if the harbour were to be re-excavated, all of the original stonework is in situ under the compacted infill.

Former Royal Canal Ticket Office at Longford Harbour

Another prominent building on the site of the infilled harbour is listed by the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage as being the former Royal Canal Ticket Office and may have been originally built as a warehouse or store for the canal. With the harbour now gone you can follow a path down underneath the railway to the other side where the new terminus of the canal is now.

Railway sheds as seen from the new terminus of the canal. The lie off to one side between the new terminus and the old harbour.

The first 1.5km of the canal from the new terminus to just beyond Farranyoogan Bridge holds water and is home to a considerable number of ducks, moorhens, butterflies and dragon flies. Longford County Council also recently finished upgrading the canal path on both sides with a smooth tarmac surface and lighting from the start as far as Churchlands Bridge, a distance of nearly 3km.

Watered section of Longford Branch with tarmac paths and lighting on both sides of the canal.

This section the of the canal is the venue of the popular Run Canal Run Longford which offers runners a choice of 10k, half marathon, full marathon and an ultra marathon running loops up one side and back the other between the terminus and Churchlands Bridge. This section also celebrates Irish athlete and Longford native Ray Flynn who ran an impressive 89 sub 4 minute miles over the course of his career and still holds the Irish 1 mile record with a time of 3:49.77 ran in Oslo in July 1982.

Ray Flynn Mile Challenge sign on the Canal Path

The first bridge we come to, a little less than 1.5km from the harbour is Farranyoogan Bridge and is the most prominent and visible bridges along the Longford Branch. It is possible to pass under the bridge on the eastern side of the canal.

Farranyoogan Bridge

A very short distance after the bridge there is a dam which ensures the first section we have just completed remains watered from the local springs nearby. From here on to the junction with the Main Line is dry. It is a little over 1km from Farranyoogan Bridge to Churchlands Bridge and the canal bed is visible for almost all of this section, with much of the overgrowth that was in the canal removed when the paths were done.

The dry bed of the canal between Farranyoogan Bridge and Churchlands Bridge.

Churchlands Bridge is a now out of use bridge built in the first half of the 20th century on the site of a former canal bridge dating back to the building of the Longford Branch.

Churchlands Bridge as viewed from the Longford town side.

Unfortunately after the closing of the canal in the early 1960’s several culverted road crossing at the canal level were built by Longford County Council to by-pass the narrow and often hump backed bridges of the canal that were not designed for the traffic of the 1960’s let alone today. All of these culverts on the Main Line have since been replaced by bridges allowing for full navigation of the Main Line, however two such culverts remain on the Longford Branch, both carrying the N63 and remain as probably the biggest cost and obstacle in reopening the Longford Branch to navigation.

Standing on the culverted road crossing of the N63 looking at the back of Churchlands Bridge.

It is necessary to come off the canal path at Churchlands Bridge to cross the N63 over to the other side where the canal path now becomes single sided continuing on the east side only. The surface of the path here changes to a stone trail but apart from the occasional short patch is consistent with the stone dust trail we are used to on much of the Main Line Greenway. It is 1km from here to where we must pass over another culverted road crossing of the N63 near Knockanboy Bridge.

Looking back across the culverted N63 crossing near Knockanboy Bridge

The old road Knockanboy Bridge carried and was by-passed by the culvert is still open and the main road can be seen swerving around it on either end from the top of the bridge.

Knockanboy Bridge obscured by trees growing in the channel of the canal

It can be noted that as the Longford Branch was built after the Main Line and additionally after the original Royal Canal Company was wound up, the bridges are not named for company subscribes or owners of the land on which they were built but simply named now for the townlands they are in.

Shortly after Knockanboy Bridge the canal path lines up briefly with the R397. There is a small petrol station with a shop only a short distance down the road here and this is the only opportunity you will have to get any supplies should you want any one this section.

Turning the corner away from the road you pass over a small aqueduct before reaching Cloonturk Bridge. Cloonturk Bridge still provides an important function as you must cross it over to the west side of the canal to carry on the canal path.

Looking over Cloonturk Bridge

Carrying on down the west side of the canal we pass an charming remote cottage which is still lived in.

Cottage on the Longford Branch

It is just over 1km from Cloonturk Bridge to Newtown Bridge. Most of the Longford Branch between Churchlands Bridge and Cloonsheerin now has considerable tree growth or reeds along the channel and as such the bridges are fairly obscured from sight.

Looking towads Cloonsheerin from the top of Newtown Bridge

It is roughly 1.5km from Newtown Bridge to Aghantrah Bridge. Between the two bridges the canal path goes around a small clump of trees which may originally been part of the canal as place to allow other boats to pass. There is also a another small aqueduct that you would hardly notice. There is a 90 degree turn to the south just before Aghantrah Bridge itself.

Aghantrah Bridge

There is a third aqueduct carrying the canal over a small stream below between Aghantrah and Cloonsheerin Bridge. The two bridges are 700m apart.

The grassy crossing of Cloonsheerin Bridge.

Around the next bend and 300m further down you will come to the dam and the junction with the Main Line of the Royal Canal. You will also see the familiar sight of the National Famine Way Shoes.

National Famine Way Shoes at Cloonsheerin

At the junction of the canal, Cloondara is only 8km to the right while Ballymahon is a little over 15km if you go to your left.

Dam at the junction with the Main Line viewed from the east side of the canal.

Waterways Ireland undertook a feasibility study into the restoration of the Longford Branch of the Royal Canal in 2014 but unfortunately the link to the study no longer works. Not factoring in the cost of the project the study was generally positive about the condition of the Longford Branch and also had so insights to the variety of wildlife that can be found on it.

Royal Canal Main Line at Cloonsheerin

While the section is not navigable the canal path is in good condition and the branch is well worth the detour for those who have the time or is a pleasant journey for those starting out in Longford Town. It also serves as a good reminder of all the amazing work done to restore the Main Line as it illustrates how quickly nature can take over when left to itself.

Part 1: North Wall to Cross Guns Bridge

Part 2: Cross Guns Bridge to Castleknock

Part 3: Castleknock to Leixlip Confey

Part 4: Leixlip Confey to Maynooth

Part 5: Maynooth to Enfield

Part 6: Enfield to Thomastown

Part 7: Thomastown to Mullingar Harbour

Part 8: Mullingar to Coolnahay

Part 9: Coolnahay to Ballynacargy Bridge

Part 10: Ballynacargy to Abbeyshrule

Part 11: Abbeyshrule to Ballybrannigan

Part 12: Ballybrannigan to the 41st Lock

Part 13: 41st Lock to Richmond Harbour

Part 14: The Lough Owel Feeder

Annex 1: The Old Rail Trail – Mullingar to Athlone

Categories
Grand Canal

Walking on the Grand Canal: Hazelhatch to Sallins

The 13km section of the Royal Canal between Hazelhatch and Sallins is a very accessible and enjoyable stretch for walkers, runners and cyclists alike. It can easily reached by taking the short train journey to Hazelhatch Railway Station from Heuston Station in Dublin and then it is possible to get the train back to either Hazelhatch or Heuston from Sallins, both stations only a few minutes walk off the canal. Both Hazelhatch and Sallins also have car parks at the stations if you are travelling by car.

Old Station House at Hazelhatch Train Station

Hazelhatch is located just a little bit outside Celbridge on the Dublin and Kildare border and the canal can be accessed at the narrow Hazelhatch Bridge.

Hazelhatch Bridge looking west

McEvoys pub is also located beside the bridge and is a good place to have a pint to close out an evening or as a place to stop as you pass by on a longer trek.

Hazelhatch is home to a good number of boats, many of them live-aboard’s and includes some Heritage Boats like the former Grand Canal Company boats 36M, 42M, 56M and 58M as well as the older Horse Boat No. 1 now known as Misneach.

36M
42M
56M
58M
Misneach

The canal path from Hazelhatch to Sallins is entirely traveled on the south bank of the canal and is of good surface quality for the majority of the route but it is necessary to be mindful of cars for a good part of it also.

Canal Path west of Hazelhatch

About 1.5km west of Hazelhatch you come to Aylmer Bridge named for the Aylmer family of Donadea Demense. The bridge also marks the start of the boundary wall of the Lyons Estate in the area of Lyons Hill which runs alongside the canal for several kilometres.

Aylmer Bridge looking west

1km on from Aylmer Bridge is the double chambered 13th Lock. The 13th Lock lies close to a cemetery just below it on the south leading to the suggestion that the 13th Lock is haunted. There are also stories that the 13th Lock on the Royal is haunted. I have never found out for certain to which one Arthur Griffith’s poem refers.

Lower Chamber of the 13th Lock

Above the 13th Lock lies the Lock Yard including the Pantry. Part of the Cliff at Lyons, it is an ideal place to stop for a snack or take away cake and coffee. The Lock Yard was originally the site of a mill which was built by Valentine Lawless, 2nd Baron Cloncurry who was noted as a canal enthusiast and also served as the Chairman of the Grand Canal Company. The mill was later run by the Shackleton family, related to Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton until it burned down in 1903. Botanical artist Lydia Shackleton, the Royal Botanical Garden Dublin’s first artist in residence lived here for several years. After the Cloncurry title became extinct in 1929 the Lyons Estate fell into disrepair and was bought and restored by Ryanair founder Tony Ryan from the mid 1990’s on.

Henry Bridge

Just a little over a kilometre on from the 14th Lock we come to Henry Bridge named for a family from nearby Straffan. Henry Bridge is located in the village of Ardclough, resting place of Arthur Guinness. A small shop is located just north of the bridge past Ardclough GAA club for anyone looking for supplies and the burial place of Arthur Guinness can be visited by travelling south of the bridge for a few minutes. A little further west of the bridge we pass the original Ardclough National School that was build in 1839.

Ardclough National School of 1839

We continue along the narrow road on the south bank for another 2.5km when we reach Ponsonby Bridge. When passing under the bridge you can see that it has been widened on both sides for the road traffic it carries and as a result the original faces of the bridge have been lost.

Ponsonby Bridge

When we emerge on the other side of the bridge we have lost the smooth path and road we have enjoyed from Hazelhatch to this point and enter a more grassy section. Most of the remainder of the distance to Sallins is soft ground. The majority of it is fine for walking and cycling with a hybrid or a mountain bike but a few small sections tend to remain muddy throughout the year.

Canal path west of Ponsonby Bridge

It is a further 2.5km to Devonshire Bridge. This stretch tends to be a lot quieter than the section around Hazelhatch and the Lyons Estate and offers a real rural feel even though we are still well within the commuter belt of Dublin. The railway is not far to the north of the canal and trains can often be heard but unlike the Royal Canal, they are rarely seen.

Devonshire Bridge

The 14th Lock follows shortly after passing under Devonshire Bridge. The original Lock Keeper’s Cottage has been restored and extended as a private residence.

Looking down into the 14th Lock Chamber

It is just over half a kilometre then to the 15th Lock and the remains of it’s Lock Keeper’s Cottage.

15th Lock with remains of the Lock Keeper’s Cottage in the background.

Leaving Dublin, it is noticeable that the Grand Canal follows very long straight lines south west. Not long after passing the 15th Lock the canal takes an obvious turn to the west as it leads towards Sallins. 2km from the lock we are greeted by the Railway Bridge that passes over the canal bringing trains into Sallins from Dublin.

Railway Bridge Crossing the canal before Sallins

It is just over 1km from the railway bridge into Sallins. The canal path narrows here and as it is sheltered it can get quiet mucky for a few hundred metres along this stretch.

Narrow path coming into Sallins

Like Hazelhatch, Sallins is the home to a good many boats and you can even see plenty of post boxes for each of the live aboard’s along the jetty on the east side of Sallins Bridge.

Sallins Bridge

Sallins is where we finish today. The small town just outside Naas has a good selection of take-away’s just off the canal, a Supervalu and even though we are on the 15th level the 13th Lock Gastro and Brew Pub is a great spot to stop for a bite and a few drinks. For those who would like to see the canal as it should be seen it is possible to book a cruise on a barge in Sallins on the blue and white barge in the picture above.

For those who don’t fancy the walk back to Hazelhatch, Sallins Railway Station is only a 3 minute walk off the canal.

Sallins Railway Station

Walking on the Grand Canal: Sallins to Robertstown

Walking on the Grand Canal: Naas Branch

Walking on the Grand Canal: Naas Harbour to Corbally Harbour

A Guide to Staying on the Right Side of the Grand Canal: Grand Canal Dock to Edenderry

A Guide to Staying on the Right Side of the Grand Canal: Edenderry Branch to Tullamore

Categories
Grand Canal

Walking on the Grand Canal: Sallins to Robertstown

Leaving Sallins on the north bank of the Grand Canal we pass a Waterways Ireland service block and like the eastern side of Sallins Bridge there is always a good number of boats found tied up across from the old Odlums mill. It is a 12km journey to Robertstown.

Looking west from Sallins Branch

Not long after we leave Sallins we pass by the remains of an old dry dock on the opposite bank. If you look closely you can see the wall at the entrance of the now filled in dock which is also beside the access point to the tow path for the Naas Branch of the canal.

Wall of the filled in Dry Dock before the Naas Branch

Beyond the dry dock we come to the triangular Soldier’s Island and the junction with the Naas Branch. Past the island we pass under the new bridge that carries the Sallin’s Ring Road over the canal before we reach the Leinster Aqueduct which carries the canal over the River Liffey.

Leinster Aqueduct from the bank of the Liffey

Not far beyond the Leinster Aqueduct we find a rather unique circular stone overflow. The Guide to the Grand Canal refers to it as “the big pot, the little pot, the boolawn and the skillet”. The workings of the overflow are explained by The Helpful Engineer. It is an interesting albeit overgrown feature of the Grand Canal. It would be great to see the overgrowth cut back to see the actual workings of this unusual piece of engineering. The overflow itself would have spilled into a stream behind it that then flows down into the Liffey

The inner basin of the overflow west of the Leinster Aqueduct.

As we round the next corner we come to Digby Bridge and the 16th Lock. This bridge is one of two to bear the name Digby along the Grand Canal. Another can be found just east of Tullamore at the 25th Lock.

Digby Bridge with the 16th Lock behind it.

The canal path turns to grass again when we cross over the road but staying on the north bank of the canal. It is little over 1km to Landenstown Bridge and the 17th Lock. On the opposite side of the canal is the gate into Landenstown Estate which is boasts a Palladian country house and large farm in much need of renovation. Landenstown House was built for the Digby family around 1740. The Digby family who apart from being land owners in Kildare, at one stage also owned the Aran Islands. The house and grounds were owned and farmed by a German man from the 1940’s until the early 2000’s. Yeomanstown Stud purchased the vast property in 2017.

17th Lock Chamber and Landenstown Bridge

After Landenstown Bridge we have just over 1km of road to travel along before we join up again with a grass path as the canal takes a turn away from the road towards the 18th Lock.

Approaching the 18th Lock

It is 1.5km from the 18th Lock to the Burgh Bridge. It is usually around this stretch that you will hear hear the engines of the cars racing around nearby Mondello Park which lies just 1km south of the Bridge. Burgh Bridge boasts several rope grooves that would have been carved into the stone over the years by horses pulling barges past the bridge, a great reminder of the working past of the canal. It is worth looking out for rope grooves on many canal bridges.

Rope Grooves on the east corner of Burgh Bridge

It is nearly two 2km on the grass bank to Bonynge or Healy’s Bridge. At Healy’s Bridge it is best to come up and cross over to the other side to finish out the last stretch to Robertstown. Standing on top of the bridge you can see where the Blackwater Feeder once entered the canal to the right of the main line towards Robertstown. It once connected an artificial reservoir, Ballinafagh Lake to the canal but was closed in 1952 and is now partly filled in. The lake is now protected as a Special Area of Conservation.

Looking west from Healy’s Bridge

We are now on the final 2km approach to our destination at Robertstown. On reaching Robertstown you are greeted by what was the Grand Canal Hotel. A splendid hotel in the early life of the canal the hotel later became an RIC Barracks and also served as a community centre. Currently unused one can only hope it will find new life and not fall into dereliction much like the similar looking Grand Canal Hotel in Shannon Harbour.

Former Grand Canal Hotel

You will generally find several boats in Robertstown Harbour and there are several pubs, shops and a cafe in the village to stock up or get a feed. Robertstown Community Amenities Association are currently in the process of trying to restore Heritage Boat 52M. An outboard engine was fitted during the summer of 2019 and the barge made its own way down the canal to Shannon Harbour for an inspection to take place. I finish this section at Binn’s Bridge.

Binn’s Bridge, Robertstown.

Walking on the Grand Canal: Hazelhatch to Sallins

Walking on the Grand Canal: Naas Branch

Walking on the Grand Canal: Naas Harbour to Corbally Harbour

A Guide to Staying on the Right Side of the Grand Canal: Grand Canal Dock to Edenderry

A Guide to Staying on the Right Side of the Grand Canal: Edenderry Branch to Tullamore